Sugar Smarts

FoodCorps is helping kids become sugar detectives: learning where it comes from, how to read nutrition labels, and preparing healthy treats that satisfy their sweet tooth while keeping them on the path to healthier, longer lives.

Label Sleuthing

Abigail Shelton - Rethink Your Drink LessonService members love the Rethink Your Drink lesson, which shows teens (and their parents) just how much sugar is in their favorite beverages. It’s a guaranteed springboard for great conversation, as CA alum Monica Drazba shared: “Students were asking a lot of questions about the topic and admitted that they had never thought about what they were drinking. … They are at a unique age where they’re starting to making life choices, and it’s promising to see that many students want the option to be healthy adults.”

Shaping School Culture: The Bake Sale

FoodCorps is proving bake sales don’t have to be sugary to be successful, as Chelsea Krist demonstrated in Iowa: selling mini banana bread muffins, fresh smoothies, and mini fruit tarts for 25 cents apiece, she helped kids raise $500 to fund a student’s new electric wheelchair. “We had a line out the doors—parents, family members, teachers, and students all participated!”

Recipe Inspiration

Service members introduce simple, seasonal, delicious recipes throughout the year that kids love —and can make on their own. Here are just a few highlights from this year:

Krizl Soriano supported a Connecticut student with her senior project on sugary drinks and healthy alternatives , like these infused waters.
Krizl Soriano supported a Connecticut student with her senior project on sugary drinks and healthy alternatives , like these infused waters.
In New Jersey, Hayley Klein shared a recipe for baked apple chips, made from apples sourced locally from New York.
In New Jersey, Hayley Klein shared a recipe for baked apple chips, made from apples sourced locally from New York.

“Ever since you taught us how to make parfaits I’ve been making it at home as a snack. My mom used to give me a bag of chips, but now I know a healthy snack so I make the parfait instead.”

—Connecticut fourth grader, a few weeks after Service Member Sarah O’Brien taught her class a recipe for apple, yogurt, and multigrain cereal parfait